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Birds - What To Do About A Noisy Parrot

In this article, now that we've covered how to get your parrot to talk, we're going to cover what to do when you can't get him to shut his beak.

Fact of life. Parrots make a noise and it's not always a pleasant one. Even the quietest of parrots can make you wish you'd bought a goldfish instead and the ones that spend all day screaming like a fire truck make you wish you lived out in the country somewhere.

So, the question is...How do you get that blasted bird to shut up?

The experts say to become more informed about how birds communicate and why they do what they do.

The first thing you have to understand is what is normal for a bird as far as its vocal patterns. For starters, you have to understand that there is no such thing as a quiet parrot. Living with a parrot is kind of like living with a roommate. He'll squawk for hours sometimes and then pass out in front of the television.

The more comfortable a bird is with its surroundings the more it will talk. That's why when you first take your parrot home it will be fairly quiet and begin to speak more as time marches on.

A normal vocalization for a parrot is, fortunately, not all day long. Parrots will begin their vocal exercises early in the morning and then quickly quiet down. They will then start up again around sunset. They will also get a little chatty after taking a nap. This may not be a bad thing as you do want to know that your parrot is still breathing.

Some birds are so happy with their surroundings that they speak more often than other birds. This is not to suggest that if you want your bird to be quiet you routinely do what you can to make its life miserable.

If you feel that your bird is speaking more than is normal, then it is quite possible that you chose a species that is more vocal than others. A Macaw can scream at ear deafening decibels for up to ten minutes at a time without coming up for air.

The thing you need to do as an owner is to recognize the difference between a parrot that is chirping because it is happy and one that is upset. There is a definite difference in the sound with the latter having a tone of desperation and unhappiness.

Once you've determined the cause of the noise, one thing you can do to quiet your parrot down is to give it something to do. Birds that are bored scream more. There are a number of toys you can get for your parrot. Just place them in his cage and you will notice a decrease in the amount of noise coming from the cage.

Also, make sure your parrot has a proper diet. A healthy bird is not going to be as noisy as one that is sick and screaming because of this.

But the bottom line is simply this. You bought a parrot and parrots are noisy. As long as the noise isn't excessive, which you should be able to determine from the tips above, you are simply going to have to learn to live with your fine feathered friend.

Of course you could always go out and get that goldfish.

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Michael Russell
Your Independent guide to Birds
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